Protecting Your Stuff During Life’s Changes

Life will always have ups and downs, and change is the only constant. During different times in your life, you may find yourself with too many things and now to put them. Storage units can be a great way to put your stuff on hold – it's still yours, but you do not have to…

Life will always have ups and downs, and change is the only constant. During different times in your life, you may find yourself with too many things and now to put them. Storage units can be a great way to put your stuff on hold – it's still yours, but you do not have to worry about where to put it or who is keeping an eye on it when you're away.

Image breaks: Not sure what to do with your microwave, mini-fridge, or plastic crates of computer equipment at the end of the semester? Sure, you can sell stuff on eBay or Craigslist, but what if you still want it next semester? If you're back with your parents for the summer, there may not be space in your old room to store your new appliances and your collection of beanie babies from when you were in elementary school. Renting a storage unit can be an inexpensive and convenient way to store your things, and a storage unit can streamline the move from your dorm to home … and back to your dorm or apartment in the fall.

Military deployment or other extended travel: Military deployments can last up to fifteen months, and extended travel for work, school, or fun could last for months or years. If you're renting an apartment, terminating your lease and putting your debts into a storage unit can save you hundreds or thousands of dollars per month. If you own your home and you live alone – or if your family will not be staying in the home while you're gone – you may be able to put your furniture and possessions into storage and rent your home while you're away, giving you an additional source of income. Storage units can also be a great way to store your car and other vehicles in a safe place during your deployment or travel time.

Moving or remodeling: When you're trying to sell your home, you might need a place to temporarily hide some of your stuff – for example, the recliner that has been well-loved for many years but that does not look appealing to a potential buyer … or the plastic tubs that hold materials for sewing and craft projects but fill up the entire closet in the guest room. And if you're remodeling, you might need to stash your precious antique furniture so that Great-Grandma Mabel's rocking chair does not get paint or plaster spilled on it. Having a climate-controlled environment to store your clutter or your family heirlooms for safekeeping can make all the difference to your peace of mind during a time that can otherwise seem hectic and disorganized.

Moving in with another person: Whether it's living with roommates or taking the plunge into cohabitation as a couple, sometimes you just can not fit multiple people's stuff into one residence. Maybe you've got a box of redundant kitchen appliances, or maybe you and your roommates just can not agree on what couch to keep in the living room. In any case, storing your extra stuff can help give you some time to decide, and you'll still have your stuff if you change your mind – whether you're changing your mind about the couch or about the roommates.